Direct Money Transfer Scam

As a precautionary measure, we should do our research when it comes to online ads before we confirm a shipment. Online selling/shopping has its risks.

My cousin recently posted her online ad on OLX for an iPhone 6s she was selling. An eager, wait, too eager buyer responded to her online ad and immediately proceeded to making the so-called direct money transfer. There are many red flags, however, with this direct money transfer.

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  1. The email address onlineverificationdepartment@accountant.com – One Google search will tell you that @accountant.com has frequently been associated with online scammers.
  2. The Direct Money logo is actually owned by http://www.direct-money.com. If the transfer was legit, the email address should have contained something like onlineverificationdepartment@direct-money.com
  3. The Payment Approved logo, upon doing a Google search image, has a different filename.
  4. The orange logo with the text Send Money Worldwide belongs to Ria Financial.
  5. The disclaimer about the escrow payment. This puts the seller in a precarious position because no funds have been received by the seller and the buyer is requesting for the item to be shipped.
  6. It’s signed by Direct Money Transfer Service but there is no link to a website that you can click through. Nowhere in the email is a clickable link indicating which financial or remittance agency the wire transfer was supposedly made from.
  7. Copyrighted by Continental Exchange Solutions, Inc., which Ria Financial is a part of. However, the Track a Transfer in Ria Financial Services’ website does not return a valid money transfer starting with DMT.
  8. The logos, like any other in the email, cannot be clicked through.

 

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Be warned when you come across an email address coming from @accountant.com especially when it comes to payments.

On behalf of my cousin, I replied to the interested buyer that we will put the shipment on hold until the payment has been received. He was requesting to have the iPhone 6s sent to an address in Balibago, Angeles, Pampanga to a different recipient. I made it clear to him that I did contact Direct-Money.com (seeing as their logo was used in the email confirmation for the wire transfer) via the Hong Kong phone number. I spoke with a Nigel Hazell who was kind enough to verify after I forwarded the email confirmation with their logo on it that the transfer was not done via their company nor their partner agencies.

 

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The interested buyer somehow got defensive in his subsequent email replies. His scam has been exposed and he has been found guilty. He literally wanted my cousin to cancel the shipment while he sulks his sorry, guilty, pathetic ass. Never mind the bad punctuation. The syntax strangely reminds me of those Nigerian scam emails.

 

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It’s so bad because it seems he doesn’t know how to communicate. He DID see the pictures of the phone in the OLX online ad and in the OLX private chat my cousin did send him a few additional images of the phone. He continued to evade my question about which remittance agency in the Philippines the money can be claimed if indeed he was being truthful about the wire transfer. He went on with his ad hominems and I told my cousin to desist replying to him. It’s a shame other legit companies like Direct-Money.com and RiaFinancial.com have been dragged into this direct money transfer scam to make it look like the bogus wire transfer was real.

 

 

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