Posted in Mobile App, Travel

Can I Use Grab Overseas?

 

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So you’re planning a trip outside of the Philippines but just within Southeast Asia and you’re asking yourself, can I use Grab overseas? The answer is yes. But can I use Grab overseas and still have my Grab rewards points intact? The answer is also yes.

Sometime last year I went out of the country and used my Grab mobile app overseas. This entailed a change to the local sim card and when I landed in NAIA 3 after my trip, I saw my Grab rewards points restarted to zero even though I had the same email address with which I registered my Grab account with. No one in Grab Support could satisfactorily address my concern.

Since they overhauled their system, the option to link one’s Grab account to a Google account or a Facebook account has become available. This feature helped keep the rewards points intact even if you are changing your Philippine sim card to a local one. I’ve done this in Thailand and Vietnam. I would insert my Thai or Vietnam sim card once I arrive at the airport or at the land border. As I had emphasized in this article, I do recommend using a local sim if you plan to get around as much as you can in Southeast Asia where Grab transport service is available. I cannot stress enough how it is the safest option for tourists.

The catalog for rewards points redeemable vary from one country to another. I had wanted that iFlix subscription for 1 year for Platinum Members worth 2,100 points but the Grab Vietnam market does not offer it as it was only available in the Philippines.

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Posted in Android, Food Delivery, Lifestyle, Mobile App, Telco, Travel

Best Mobile Apps in Vietnam For Expats and Tourists

My first travel experience in Vietnam was not a very pleasant one and looking back, I knew I had to write about this guide to the best mobile apps to use in Vietnam for tourists and travelers. These are the best mobile apps to use in Vietnam whichever city you may be in:

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GRAB – I will primarily start with the transport service mobile app Grab because of that not so pleasant incident when I first arrived in Ho Chi Minh via the land border. When you don’t know the language of the place you’re going into in Southeast Asia, Grab can be trusted to give you the correct fares and take you safely to your booked accommodation. It’s not uncommon for unsuspecting Ho Chi Minh tourists to report being charged ridiculous exorbitant fares by unregistered taxi drivers. If you came from a neighbouring country like Thailand, Laos or Cambodia and you already have a Grab account, you can still use your Grab mobile app to book a ride to get to your hotel. If you’re coming to Vietnam via the land border, you’ll be glad to know some buses offer free WiFi and this will allow you to book a Grab ride long before the bus leaves the drop-off spot. If you’re coming in via an international flight, the airports offer free WiFi too.

I personally have taken more Grab Bike rides than the Grab Car/Taxi ones because I prefer to look around and explore.

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GOOGLE TRANSLATE – There aren’t a lot of Vietnamese on the street you can ask clear directions or recommendations about so you need Google Translate mobile app for communicating with them.

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Google Translate mobile app does not always get it right but it can get across the general idea of what you’re trying to inquire.

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MY VIETTEL/MY MOBIFONE – If you intend to stay longer than a week, you might want to get serious about buying a local SIM card. You can see Viettel and Mobifone SIM cards being sold in airports and some currency exchangers even sell them. Once you have bought a SIM card, you can download the corresponding mobile app. I had a brief experience with using Mobifone last year so I cannot write about it. I’ve used Viettel the longest. You can top up at Circle K or Vinamart convenience stores or any stores with the sign boards Viettel or Mobifone.

A local SIM card is very useful for answering your Grab driver’s calls. Even if I don’t understand the driver, I would ask for help from a guard or valet nearby to assist me by letting them talk to the driver on my behalf. No need to be shy. It’s also useful for food delivery.

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NOW.VN/FOODY – NOW.VN or Foody is a food delivery service with many merchants to use from ranging from lunch, drinks, desserts, or fast food. There are a lot of healthy choices and some stores offer discounts. My only problem with NOW.VN is the debit card limitation – it won’t accept my home country-issued Visa and MasterCard debit cards. I’ve tried only to be greeted with a card declined confirmation.

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I could only pay in cash for my orders. However, you will be granted 1,000 VND credits to your Foody account after a completed delivery.

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VIETNAMMM – Vietnammm is also a food delivery service although it’s not as varied as Foody, its best feature is the availability of PayPal as a payment option. I did compare the menu of one restaurant which is also listed on Foody and the latter has one item more. You can filter your searches via payment options as well.

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CGV CINEMAS – There are more CGV Cinemas here in Hanoi and I’ve used it to check schedules. Pre-booking cinema tickets is not ideal for those holding a non-local debit card. Again, this has something to do with the same debit card limitation I mentioned with the Foody mobile app. I could only really browse for schedules on the day I’m watching the movie as their schedules often vary. By downloading the app and signing up for an account, you are eligible to earn rewards points for money spent as long as you present the CGV Cinemas mobile app to the ticket counter for QR scanning.

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LOTTE CINEMA VIETNAM – There are more Lotte Cinema branches in Ho Chi Minh than there are in Hanoi. It’s a shame there is no IMAX theatre here, though.

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SPEED LOTTE – I only knew about Speed Lotte mobile app because one store clerk approached me about it and had me sign up while I was browsing tissue boxes at Lotte Mart. Speed Lotte allows you to pick items on their grocery menu and Lotte Mart will have it delivered to your doorstep.

Posted in Travel

How To Avoid Getting Offloaded By Immigration

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In all those times I had traveled out of the Philippines via NAIA, I know immigration interview questions can be tedious and long-winding. It would be easy for one to think that the immigration officers are just being thorough, but when you’re anxious you won’t make it to the boarding gate on time, you can’t help but think the odds are against you. I had never experienced getting offloaded by immigration. Almost, yes. In this regard, I would like to share my experience in handling immigration interview questions in NAIA.

Deferred I first got out of the country when I worked for a company in Malaysia in December 2007. I had all the relevant documents for my employment there so it wasn’t as challenging as the immigration interview I faced when I was at NAIA I bound for Darwin, Australia.

February 2012. My return trip is It was a long queue yet the immigration officer took her time with me. She asked me, “What is your purpose for this Australian trip?”, “Do you have a boyfriend there?”, “Do you have a sponsor?”, “How long are you staying there?”

I was there for more than 5 minutes. I answered all her questions truthfully yet she rose from her seat for a split second to consult with her supervisor perhaps but she quickly decided against it and told me, “Alam mo naman siguro anong gagawin mo ‘dun. Bahala ka na sa buhay mo, malaki ka na.” (I trust you know what you’re doing as an adult.) And with that biting humour, she stamped my passport and let me through.

Why did she not decide on getting me offloaded? Although she didn’t address it directly, I knew she had her doubts because of the original travel plan indicated when I applied for my Australian tourist visa back in October 2011. I got myself a booking certificate (not a confirmed ticket) from a travel agency for a tentative travel date, November 11-15, 2011. My final itinerary was February 2012 to March 2012. TIP: Be consistent with the supposed itinerary indicated in your tourist visa application. 

August 2008. It was an annual company trip to Taipei, Taiwan and I was still working for a company in Malaysia then. My palate didn’t really favour the Malaysian cuisine that much and I was emaciated. I also endured bad acne which contradicted the cleaner passport version of my face. It was so embarrassing being held up by Taiwanese immigration solely because I did not look anywhere near the person on my passport. I felt like I stole someone else’s identity even though I had an approved visa to show them. I think the only people in the world who ever knew about this experience were my co-workers as I did not feel comfortable talking about it even in jest to my friends. There recently has been news about a Filipina getting offloaded for the mere change in hair colour. I do not know if this news bit is related. TIP: It’s obvious. Don’t change your appearance too much if you can help it. 

May 2016. I was in NAIA 3 and Hong Kong bound for a short birthday trip. The immigration officer asked me, “What do you do for a living?” “Have you ever traveled outside the Philippines before this?” “Where would you be staying in Hong Kong?” “What was your job then in Malaysia?” “You traveled to Australia before. What did you do there?” “Did you have a sponsor for that Australian trip?” “Did you travel by yourself?” “Did you have a boyfriend there?” “Do you have a credit card?” “Can you show me your birth certificate?” It was longer than the immigration interview in February 2012 and he mostly addressed the Australian trip 4 years ago. TIP: It was at this point that I realised I had to have a clear folder with all my documents in it so all the immigration officer would do is browse through them and ask less questions. My clear folder contains the Booking.com accommodation, my return ticket, my Upwork’s certificate of earnings, a photocopy of my USD savings account’s passbook, and my birth certificate.

October 2017. Mactan International Airport in Cebu. This time I was Kuala Lumpur-bound but my return ticket (a faux one) was departing from Bangkok and arriving in Manila 2 weeks from date of departure in Cebu. I did have a clear folder with me with all my papers in it but the immigration officer wouldn’t have it. He took out a form and told me an immigration officer would interview me after I fill out the form. It was a form for a potential deferred departure and it was to be assessed by an immigration officer. I honestly was more worried about being late for boarding (even though I was an hour early) than for the prospect of being offloaded, which I cared little about because my gut told me not to worry.

The form was so-so. I remember writing down my permanent address in Cagayan de Oro, my purpose for traveling overseas for two weeks, my contact number, my email address, my employer’s address, etc. I sat down with an immigration officer and she asked me, “What are you going to do in Malaysia?” “What are you going to do in Bangkok?” “What is your job?” “You’re staying overseas for a total of 2 weeks. What are you going to do there?” “Why did you not book a return ticket for Cagayan de Oro?” It obviously wasn’t enough for her that I had a return ticket that states I would be landing in Manila. Manila is still Philippines, Ma’am. She then wrote some comments on the last page of the form. She cleared me for travel because what was in my clear book was proof enough that I could take care of myself financially overseas. TIP: Be consistent with your return ticket – if you go to Malaysia, your return ticket should show you would be departing from Malaysia before coming back to your home country.

This was a serious blunder I overlooked as I had always shown my consistent return ticket before. Even if you have financial documents to support your two-country destinations, the immigration officers will flag you for it even before they see your income on paper. In my previous travels, I would book a separate return ticket slated for 2 weeks from Philippine departure date. I would not use this return ticket that is why I call it a faux return ticket because I use up the destination country’s allowable period for a Philippine passport holder. What happens to the faux ticket? I file a reimbursement for the airport tax with the airline. At least with AirAsia this is possible, provided the faux ticket is for an international travel and not a domestic one. I’ve done it a few times and got refunded. My travels last year and the present year has been primarily in Indochina and AirAsia always has promo seats. For the purpose of sticking to the topic of how to avoid getting offloaded by immigration, this is the short of it as the long one is for another article.

April 2018. I departed Hanoi and arrived in Don Mueang International Airport in Bangkok. I pushed my trolley past through the NOTHING TO DECLARE gate and unloaded my luggage from the trolley for machine inspection. The Thai customs officer signaled me to halt and called his supervisor. The supervisor who knew English requested to open my luggage for inspection. The problem was that I wrapped my travel organizers with a plastic food wrap – yes, the kind that you use for food storage. Prior to traveling, I had washed my luggage inside and out and I wasn’t confident it was perfectly dry for my clothes to put in. In an obsessive-compulsive move I wrapped my travel organizers with a plastic food wrap that it was hard for the machine to see through the clothes that were actually in them. Of course, I realised too late that to the customs officers thick plastic food wrap smells like drug paraphernalia. This was a huge mistake. The germophobic part of me cringed at having to open my suitcase and finding out my use of plastic food wrap was justified because the bottom part of the suitcase was a little wet. Sigh. Yes, I was worried about the cleanliness part more than the fact that they could have wrongly detained me. TIP: Do not use plastic food wrap for maximizing the space in your suitcase. I found an alternative: wrap the travel organizer with another travel organizer. (Yes, I have OCD.)

 

 

 

 

Posted in Finance, Mobile App, Travel

Withdrawing Funds Using RCBC MyWallet Overseas

When traveling overseas we may overlook the fact that not all debit cards can be used in a lot of ATM machines. I would always recommend to bring two or more debit cards. I currently have the GCash MasterCard and RCBC MyWallet for the meantime.

I also have my PayMaya physical card which is already linked to my verified PayMaya virtual card account but I am excluding it for now because of the Ph500 roaming fee my Smart postpaid account would automatically charge me once I insert my SIM to a working phone here while being overseas. As PayMaya now requires a text verification upon logging in to the PayMaya mobile app, I don’t think it’s worth it using my Smart postpaid SIM when I have two other debit card alternatives.

In Thailand, I could withdraw funds from my GCash MasterCard in most ATM machines. Most 7-Eleven stores in Thailand have ATM machines outside the premises but you have to also make sure the ATM machine is not that of a local bank. As for the RCBC MyWallet, I have tried withdrawing cash from it in both Siam Commercial Bank and Krungsri ATM machines and have been able to transact successfully.

I should also like to mention that solely depending on GCash MasterCard is not a good option because of the monthly withdrawal limit. There were times when I’ve reached my limit in GCash on the last day of the month and I had to wait for the next day, the first day of the next month, to do a withdrawal. In case waiting might pose a hassle for you, it’s good to have other options too.

It gets tricky here in Vietnam for the RCBC MyWallet. Techcom Bank, BIDV Bank, Lienviet Post Bank, Vietcom Bank and Maritime Bank are the most common ATM machines I could run into and GCash would be accepted in all of these. The only ATM where I found I could use my RCBC MyWallet is that of VP Bank. Unlike Vietcom and Techcombank, you won’t come across VP Bank ATM machines in most big malls. I had to research VP Bank ATM locations online.

I do find my travelling situation to be unique but I hope this has helped anyone who has trouble finding a bank in Vietnam they can withdraw their funds with using RCBC MyWallet.

Posted in Mobile App, Telco, Travel

Mobile Apps for International Mobile Top-up

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If you plan to travel outside the country for a while, you need to think about mobile apps for international mobile top-up. Speaking from experience, it is never a good idea to keep your local postpaid SIM inserted on your phone unless you have managed to deactivate the roaming status with your network provider prior to getting out of the country.

If you’re a frequent traveler and you need to change SIM cards wherever you go, I recommend the mobile apps Coins.ph and Mobile Recharge for international mobile top-up. I alternate between the two mobile apps as each has unique services to offer.

I signed up with Coins.ph a few years back and completed the profile verification steps quickly. I knew Coins.ph dealt with Bitcoins primarily and they only extended their services to include mobile top-up not only for Philippine mobile numbers but also for international numbers. I have tried their Buy Load feature with my Philippine mobile numbers and also for my Vietnamese and Cambodian SIM cards and the top-up was successful. You will immediately be notified if a particular international mobile number is no longer working – your Coins.ph account balance will be adjusted.

You can top up your international mobile numbers with Mobile Recharge as well. In fact, M-Recharge mobile app is mainly for that purpose. I have used it in the past to top up my Malaysian and Thailand SIM cards. The only reason I keep Coins.ph as an alternative for mobile top-up is that the available denominations in Mobile Recharge for international mobile top-up are higher compared to that of Coins.ph. The minimum amount for international mobile top-up with Mobile Recharge is at $10 which you can conveniently purchase using your PayPal account. Coins.ph does not have the option to purchase via PayPal as users would have to top up their Coins.ph Wallet first before they can purchase using their Coins.ph account.

There are other web services and mobile apps out there for international mobile top-up but these are the two I haven’t had problems with so far.

Posted in Lifestyle, Travel

Where To Buy Cheap Luggage in Bangkok

If you’ve come to this page for information on where to buy cheap (but quality) luggage in Bangkok, then I am sure you’ve also encountered other Google search results about travel forums talking about the same topic. I also know that one of the advice you read from those travel forums mentions MBK as one of those places where you can buy cheap luggage in Bangkok. I did go to MBK my first time here in Bangkok and even though you can haggle with the small store owners, I would not recommend it and I am writing this to give you, readers, another convenient option.

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There is no shortage of buying cheap luggage in Bangkok and hailing from the Philippines myself and once in a while trying to convert my baht into pesos in my head, I have come to know the difference. My first stay in Bangkok was in May this year for two weeks and I arrived here in Nonthaburi (same place I stayed at before) on July 2nd and am about to leave on July 30th, that’s in two days from now.  During these two separate visits, I have bought 2 luggages.

When I tried going to MBK because Caucasian and European travelers alike deemed it as one of the best places to buy cheap luggage in Bangkok, I was questioning myself whether or not it was worth heeding that travel forum advice. Since I stayed in Nonthaburi in May, it was quite a travel by taxi to get to MBK. I had to pay for the toll fee once, which the Grab driver was kind enough to let me know. MBK is huge and I did scout each floors for stores selling luggages and after two hours I was not so impressed. So, yeah, you better think twice about what you read on travel forums these days.

I did find a decent page to buy cheap luggage in Bangkok, though. I tried browsing through Lazada.com’s Thailand page. I already have a Lazada account from the Philippines and I did have to sign up again by using my Google sign-in credentials, too. It was shipped to my apartment within two days and best of all, delivery was free. I bought it for 999 Baht; the ones I found in MBK were around 1500 Baht. I did get a better deal and I did not have to go out, pay for the fare and toll fees because the luggage was delivered right to my doorstep.

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My second luggage purchase from Lazada Thailand was priced at 890 Baht. I bought it just this month. You have to be aware of the dimensions you want in a luggage. The item description in the website is not lacking in that info. And, yes, I also did get it within two days from ordering it at Lazada Thailand’s website.

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If you’re staying more than a week in Bangkok and need to replace your luggage, try to browse through Lazada Thailand. Make sure you tick the option “Ships from Bangkok/Thailand”.

UPDATE: May 1, 2018

Just an FYI to anyone still searching for keywords related to this article, I have been using the 2 luggages I bought in Lazada Thailand for 10 months already and I have been consistently moving from one country to another on an average of every two months or so. Both luggages are still intact despite being constantly on the road.

Posted in Mobile App, Travel

Grab vs Uber in Thailand

I have only ever used the Uber mobile app for the first time when I arrived here in Bangkok a week ago. I had Uber downloaded on my phone about a year ago but could only use GrabTaxi in my hometown.

Upon clearing immigration at the Don Mueang International Airport, I opened Maps to ask for directions from the airport to the place I was staying. Under Ride, UberX mainly comes up along with the fare information. I paid ฿300 for the 20-minute UberX ride. I didn’t even think of comparing the fare with the Grab mobile app as I was in a hurry to leave there. The fact that Uber was integrated within the Maps app is an advantage for Uber.

Seven days, 2 Grab rides and 7 UberX rides later, I can say I’ve mostly had a more pleasant experience with Grab than Uber. Don’t let the quantity fool you. I’d had to raise the issue to Support about being prompted to pay ฿300 again for that first UberX ride. As explained in their Help section, I was apparently overcharged because of a technical issue:

For compensation, we’ve added THB 300 Uber credit to your account to reflect the difference in the amount you paid and what the trip fare should have been. Please note this Uber credit will automatically apply to your next trip fare.
However, In order to make an adjustment for a cash fare, we need you to first settle this outstanding balance. Please note that you will be unable to request rides until this balance is paid.
To pay your account balance, please sign in to your account. You can use a payment method on your account to pay your balance before you request your next trip. Here’s how it works:
1. When you try to request a trip, your app will notify you that your account is in arrears.
2. You’ll be prompted to add a credit or debit card to your Uber account.
3. After you’ve added a card, you can select it as your payment method to pay your arrears in full.

It makes sense to use up my Uber credits than to use Grab more.

What I don’t like about the Uber mobile app, though, is the inability to change my cellular number on file. When I tried to change it, it prompted me to make another account which is totally unnecessary. I don’t know why it would not recognise my Thailand cellular number, even if it’s just a traveler’s sim card. With Grab, I could switch my number on file to the Thai number, despite the latter being a traveler’s sim. Just had to emphasize that.

I also notice way too many glitches with the Uber mobile app. This resulted in so many cancellations by Uber drivers. For a 10-minute walk back to the hotel, it would take me an hour or so to successfully get an Uber ride. I could walk the way back, if only I weren’t carrying some groceries.
Posted in Mobile App, Travel

Mobile Apps For Hotel Bookings

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As a budget traveler, I have used a few mobile apps for hotel bookings. There are times when booking via a mobile app is recommended compared to a hotel booking done on the web because of the discounts made only available on its mobile app version.

It is best to ascertain what kind of traveler you are and what do you want to get out of a hotel booking or accommodation and once you take note of this, you will be able to narrow down your choices.

I mostly use Booking.com and I prefer it over Agoda. Both mobile apps and web versions are awesome to use and some blocks of room in Agoda are facilitated by Booking.com. Here’s what I think about Booking.com and Agoda mobile apps:

1 – I like hotel stay prices to be displayed as the final amount I would be paying. In this regard, Booking.com would take the most points. With Agoda, I would only see the partial price and the breakdown of the price would be seen a few pages later.

2 – When it comes to newsletter subscription headings, I noticed I would tend to ignore and delete Booking.com e-mails on hotel deals because they don’t usually come off  as a “call to action” kind of heading. They generally are about the hotel deals of a specific city you were last recorded browsing using your account. Agoda, on the other hand, has headings about a specific discount. I often find myself clicking through the Agoda e-mails because of the tempting deals. The headings draw me in to check out how I can get the 10% discount as promised within a limited time period.

3 – I recently booked via Agoda at one hotel three times within a week and two times out of those I had to do cancellations. Luckily it was the same room and it was still available for the same dates. When I click on Bookings, there isn’t really much you can change from there even though, for example, the special requests drop down menu and the submit button are still active. This seems to me as somewhat rigid. When I initially booked the room, I set it to pay later and had only 1 card saved. When I wanted to change the card under the saved payment method within the booking itself, the system won’t let me do it. Overall, there is not much change you can do within the booking itself. I had to e-mail customer support regarding the availability of changing the payment method once I’ve made my decision to pay for the booking. After almost two days, I got the reply that changing the payment method was not possible and that I had to re-book. How cumbersome. When I cancelled, I received an e-mail confirmation and it had an invitation to take a survey and leave a feedback regarding the said booking. I certainly hope they take my suggestion seriously to be flexible with making changes to a booking within the particular reservation itself.

4 – What really attracted me to Booking.com in the first place was the fact that they enable the “pay at the hotel” feature in most reservations. Although free cancellations can also be found in Agoda reservations, there’s a catch called prepayment. Because things sometimes get shitty between GCash (the main card I use) and PayPal instant withdrawal transfers, I cannot always guarantee I can do an automatic prepayment using my GCash MasterCard when PayPal and GCash delay my funds for all the sluggish reasons just because they can.

5 – Both Booking.com and Agoda mobile apps load pretty quickly.

6 – I use AirAsia and Scoot Tiger Air as alternatives to Cebu Pacific. AirAsia and Scoot sometimes have special hotel deals when you book with them and I have been able to apply these discounted rates because of their affiliated promos with Booking.com. Agoda offers Point Max where you can choose to earn miles for a particular booking. It’s not retroactive as you would have to determine your rewards program first. Only when you come to the select rooms section will you be able to view deals like how many miles you can earn with your already chosen rewards program if you book a particular room.

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7 – I have compared rates between Booking.com and Agoda with the accommodations I frequent and Booking.com always has the higher discount rates. As someone who has a Frequent Traveller badge next to my avatar, I get awesome Genius secret deals. Below is a comparison of prices I get as a Booking.com Frequent Traveller and what I get on Agoda. Both screenshots are taken from their mobile apps.

I find that an advantage for Agoda is the Book Now option which charges your card upon booking completion. Few accommodation searches I did in the same area offer the Book Now option and with discounts as high as 65%. Those kinds of deals are what I couldn’t find in Booking.com. The only problem I have with those discounted accommodations are accessibility from the train station (I’m talking about a stone’s throw away), a 7-Eleven convenience store and the mall.

Because I am a budget traveler as I mentioned in the beginning of this article, I tend to book the similar hotel upon returning to a particular country, until of course I find a better alternative. Accessibility has always been first on my list and I usually get to narrow down my options from there.

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There are rare occasions when I prefer to pay for a duration of a hotel booking immediately with a debit/credit card and Booking.com nor Agoda would not have this kind of option for the same hotel I liked. I would then resort to Hotels.com mobile app. They have discounted deals for mobile app hotel bookings only and their reward system involves an extra night free for collecting 10 nights even as a first-time user. The collected nights would be reflected 72 hours after checkout.

There is another neat option that I hope to explore someday and it’s called Trip.com as it involves train bookings as well. Perhaps when I get to travel in an ever bigger continent this might come in handy.

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Posted in Business, Marketing, Travel

Jinisys Fortifies Its Proven Track Record in Software Solutions

Jinisys Software, Inc., with offices in strategic business locations such as Alabang and Cebu City, is one of the Philippines’ most dependable provider of all-inclusive software solutions. Since 2008, Jinisys Software has developed and enhanced their oft requested office automation systems such as hotel management system, restaurant point-of-sale system and call accounting systems. Other straightforward product additions also extend their scope to property management system, asset and warehouse management system as well as shipping management system.

Their online 24/7 customer service support facilitates prompt answers to client’s inquiries. With over a hundred companies served and growing, Jinisys Software fortifies its proven track record when it comes to office automation and software solutions. Request your software solution with Jinisys Software HERE.